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Reading Poetry Aloud

Model the reading of poetry so your students can learn to read it for themselves. Here are some tips to assist you to present poetry reading successfully:


• Read it to yourself first. Consider the meaning, language, rhythm and other features of the poem that you will highlight in your reading.
• Convey the meaning of the poem with your voice.
• Allow the students to hear the poem first before they see it.
• Avoid long elaborate introductions. Give them the title and the name of the poet.
• Let the tone of your voice convey the mood.
• Let the language convey the rhythm.
• Each word of the poem is important. Savor them.
• Use your voice as a tool- whisper where appropriate, Shout if necessary, stretch words for effect!
• Employ multiple readings of the poem.
• Invite short discussion rather than long analysis. Don’t dissect each line, don’t be a lint picker!

• Avoid follow up activities for every poem. It isn’t necessary! A brief discussion, or a partner share are acceptable responses.

Students i…

Adverb.Dialogue Poems

 This idea came from Greg Pincus and I thought it was well worth sharing...

'Tag, You're It,' He Said Poetically
(a dialogue tag poem)
by Greg Pincus

'Cut them quickly,' she said speedily.

'I want them gone,' he said needily.

'Show don't tell,' he said directly.

'Use them well,' she said correctly.

'I hate adverbs,'he said whinily.

'We're all done,' she said finally.


It's a little silliness, I hope you enjoy!

Melbourne Writers Festival Schools Program

Just sharing the news regarding the upcoming Melbourne Writers Festival Schools Program. Think about those young writers who have exhibited special talent and interest and let them know about this opportunity.
Go to:
http://www.mwf.com.au/2010/content/mwf-2010-standard.asp?name=Schools-program

How To Write A Rant Poem!

This post is for Ryan, whose words brought me back here, and not before time!

The ideas for rant poems come from John Biando and I share with John's idea which has potential for use in the classroom regarding those things that genuinely cheese us off!


Poets have long written about the things that vex them. The practice of ranting in poetic verse dates back to at least Ancient Greece. Though the rant poem is not granted the same canonic acceptance as the sonnet or sestina, rant poetry has flourished from Homer's time to our own. Rant poetry comes in all shapes and sizes, but it is most commonly defined as a free-verse prose poem written about an exasperating subject. Follow the steps below to wax poetic about any subject that aggravates, pesters, or otherwise drives you batty.

 Step 1


Settle on a single subject that provokes, annoys, exasperates or infuriates you. This subject will be the topic of your rant poem.


Step 2


Brainstorm a list of reasons why your subject maddens you. Jot …