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Food News Poem

'Ideas exist in things.' 

I heard that somewhere a long time ago and have never forgotten it. So, when I'm looking for ideas, I find it extremely useful to sit perfectly still and take a careful look around me. Today, as  I sat watching people eat in a favourite cafe of mine, I began to think about food. I must admit I like thinking about food. I love both eating and cooking. 

 I began to think more particularly about food back when I was a kid. Food I liked and food I avoided. I thought about some of the things people used to say about certain foods. Not all of which was true. A bit like 'fake news' we hear so much about these days.

Eventually my thinking lead to wanting to write something down- It often does. Well, a poem began to develop in my head, so I took out my notebook and started writing. When I got home, I just had to continue preparing my poem. Here it is for you to digest.


Food News

Green jelly's made from cow's hooves
Spaghetti's made from worms
Bread is made from gluggy paste,fly dirt, grass
and germs
Beans are made from pond scum
Beetroot's monkey brains
And pumpkin's made from slimy stuff they fossick from the drains
Potato chips are just dried wax
They scrape from camel's ears
And peas are balls of hard green snot
That's been dried out for two years






Comments

  1. Thanks! Your poem started my day off with a laugh and taught me a delightful new word, "fossick". I also enjoyed reading about your thought and writing process. I'll definitely keep in mind your strategy of looking at things to generate ideas during next months Slice of Life challenge.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Molly. Glad you found something you might be able to use in your own writing process.

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  2. Hee-hee! I'm not sure I can ever eat a potato chip again without thinking about camel's ear wax. Thanks for the smiles today, Alan, something we need more of everyday. =)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Bridget. Glad it made you smile. I was probably channeling the small boy inside me with this poem. Appealing to the gross side a little.

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  3. Intrigued by your quote "Ideas exist in things" ... and liked how you walked us through your thinking. But I'm not sure I want to "digest" your poem. Thanks for the laugh!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Alice. Our process is important to share, particularly with our probationary poets. We must all find our way in the end though.

      Delete
  4. Yuck! I don't know if I can ever look at a potato chip the same way again!

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    Replies
    1. Leigh Ann, all writers wish to evoke a response from their readers. Sorry about that.

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  5. Blergh! Thanks for tha laugh, Alan, and for sharing your process.

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    1. As you know Sally, process is important to each of us. Unique as well. Our young poets need to understand how the thinking and rehearsal goes. It is an investment in the words we hope will emerge.

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  6. Well...I'm a bit put off food at the moment by your all too easy to imagine delicacies!

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    1. Oh Tara, that's no good. Visualizing is clearly a double edged sword.

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  7. EW! I think you just put me off potato chips...which might actually be a good thing!

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  8. A poet has to tell it like it is sometimes Mary. It serves to raise the awareness of consumers. Poets also like to have fun with words, which on this occasion is closer to the truth.

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  9. I think I just lost my appetite. There's a couple foods here that I eat and I'm glad I'm not having them today!
    I did enjoy learning about the definition of fossick!

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  10. Oh how fun? Might I use with my Poetry Rocks students?

    ReplyDelete

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