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Showing posts from April, 2017

Short and Sweet Poems

Let's Hear It For Short Poems!
Sometimes a poem can prove effective even though it is short in length. As a poet I appreciate poems of every length and style, but just for today I want to focus on the short and sweet version.

A short poem needs to have some punch, and because they employ so few words, word choice is particularly important.

One of my favourite short poems comes from the late and great Spike Milligan who wrote this clever little poem:

A Silly Poem

Said Hamlet to Ophelia
I'll write a poem to thee
What kind of pencil shall I use?
2B or not 2B?

I also like Lillian Moore's poem, Red. It employs a simile in a most effective way.

Red

All day
across the way
on someone's sill
a geranium glows
red bright
like a
tiny
faraway 
traffic light

I can't imagine Shel Silverstein not having fun writing this short, but very funny poem.

Anteater
"A genuine anteater,"
The pet man told me dad.
Turned out, it was an aunt eater

And now my uncle's mad!

So now I share with you dear reade…

Inspired by Walter de la Mare

Walter de la Mare's book of poetry for children, 'Peacock Pie' was first published in 1913. I have a copy of this anthology that was republished in 1962. 

Walter de la Mare (1873 - 1956) was a British author of diverse talent who wrote everything from poetry to horror stories to children's books. His writing focused around the themes of childhood, imagination, and the supernatural. 

During my school days I recall being introduced to Walter de la Mare's poetry and a lot of it has stuck, which is a sure sign that his words made a connection. I particularly liked the poems, 'Five Eyes' and 'Silver' which are reproduced below.

Five Eyes

Walter de la Mare

In Hans' old Mill his three black cats
Watch the bins for the thieving rats.
Whisker and claw, they crouch in the night,
Their five eyes smouldering green and bright:
Squeaks from the flour sacks, squeaks from where
The cold wind stirs on the empty stair,
Squeaking and scampering, everywhere.
Then down they pou…

Time To Skedaddle Poem

Using Colloquial Phrases and Idioms In Poetry
Idiom:
An expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its words, as in kick the bucket (meaning to die). 

Colloquialisms:
A colloquialism is a word, phrase, or other form used in informal language. Such words and phrases develop and become part of the every day language. Strangely most people know exactly what they mean. The word, 'yobbo or yob' was used frequently when I was younger. The word was applied to young men considered to be poorly dressed, bad mannered and uneducated.

Certain phrases and words expressions may develop in a particular language, dialect, or style of speaking. These terms may be used in conversation and writing in a particular country, state or region yet may be unknown to people living beyond that place, who remain unfamiliar with its use. Idioms and colloquialisms are continually being invented, while others fall out of use because they may have connections to a particular point in ti…