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Tilly Taylor's Tantrum Poem

In the space of one week, I saw two toddler tantrums while out and about in the world. A poet needs this world wandering to maintain a flow of ideas. And so it was that Tilly Taylor's Tantrum came screaming into my head...

What might you observe that could form part of a poem? What have you seen, or heard lately?


Tilly Taylor’s Tantrum

Attention please shoppers
We have a meltdown in aisle four
Right beside the confectionery stand
Young Tilly Taylor
Age five and a quarter
Is experiencing a throwdown
Customers are advised to avoid this area
Tilly’s mother said No
I repeat, No
I will not add a packet of Jelly Snakes to the shopping trolley…

And so-
A throwdown is happening right now, right here
We have-Whaa!
Piercing screams
Yelling and spit
Devil eyes
Foot stomping
And hate stares
We have trolley rattling
And more…

Shoppers in aisle four are advised to move immediately
To alternative aisles

Tilly’s mother is moving towards frozen foods
In the hope of cooling things down
Tilly Taylor remains in aisle four
Hollering and sobbing
It appears we have a tantrum running out of steam
And scream
Boo-hoo
No jolly Jelly Snakes today
No way
Thank you shoppers for your patience
In this crisis…


Price check on tissues…


Comments

  1. Haha! This is a great poem. I adore imaginary conversations or announcements based on something you see or experience. I am glad I have stumbled across your blog.

    ReplyDelete

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