Skip to main content

Taking Poetry Beyond Haiku and Acrostics in APRIL!

It is April and that means National Poetry Month in the USA! I vividly recall during my six years living and working in the US how schools went into poetry mode each April. I found this focus on poetry left me in a quandary. I love poetry, so this national focus on poetry was something that greatly impressed me. It brought this ancient genre to centre stage and I considered that was something our Australian schools could learn from. Poetry in such a supportive environment began to shed its elitist cloak. It became accessible to the broader school population.
However, something began to gnaw away at me as each successive April celebration unfolded. I became concerned that in the minds of many educators poetry was being constrained to a single month in the school calendar.

I wanted to encounter poetry across the school year, but it seemed tightly confined to the month of April in the minds of many. I wanted poetry to pop up unexpectedly; at various times of the school day, and in different subject areas. I waited patiently, but it only appeared sporadically. It had a mercurial air to it. I started advocating for poetry, suggesting it to the teachers with whom I worked. I found myself desparate to plant poetry possibilities.

Additionally, April poetry encounters often followed a very familiar refrain for many teachers. Successive groups of students were fed a steady diet of haiku and acrostic poems and little else. When one considers how diverse poetry is as a writing form, it seemed that teachers were sitting firmly in the comfort zone. Probationary poets however often find haiku quite challenging as an initial writing experience. Its defined structure requires a degree of orchestration and language mastery on the part of the writer, that many find daunting. Limericks fall into the same category.

Acrostic poems are fine if your name is Veronica or Mitchell, but you don’t have much to play with if you happen to Li, Ty or Hu!

When young writers are having their early encounters with poetry, it’s important that the experience be positive. As teachers we need to set them up to be successful, That way they are more likely to return for more- to persist! Initially they need to see and hear lots of poetry. Immersion before writing means we avoid cold starts!

Innovating on text patterns is often a good place to begin. Following patterns that provide the inexperienced poet with scaffolding for their initial efforts with verse is similar to the way training wheels support the inexperienced bicycle rider.

I often use Margaret Wise Brown’s, The Important Book with its distinctive pattern as a launching pad. This wonderful classic has worked for me every time.

The important thing about _____ is that it is _______.
It is _______.
It is _______.
And it is _______.
But the important thing about _______ is that it is _______.

Shanet, a Grade four poet innovated further on the pattern in her reponse:
\BALLOON
The important thing about a balloon is that it starts out flat!
When it gets blown up it is different colors
When you let it go it goes around and around then it falls on the floor
It’s shiny
And it holds air
But, the important thing about a balloon is that it starts out FLAT!

Some additional ideas to consider to get things started might include:

*Three Question Poem
n Where are you?
n What are you doing?
n What are you thinking?

*Select a short poem and remove certain words (those in italics) and have students attempt to reconstitute the poem using words of their own choosing. There is no one correct answer here. The idea is to make them aware of word choice.

Let the rain kissyou
Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops
Let the rain singyou a lullaby
The rain makes stillpools on the sidewalk
The rain makes running pools in the gutter
The rain plays a little sleep song on our roof at night-
And I love the rain

Langston Hughes

*In the following example, students are given a number of choices and this enhances control and ownership over the resultant poem. They choose the order of the statements and number of statements they wish to use to construct their poem. They may also add some of their own. They may choose to change the setting…

In The City
I see…..
I hear….
I watch….
I smell….
I enjoy…..
I taste…..
I want…..
I wish…..

*I like to use list poems as they have an extremely high success rate with beginning writers. List poems are represented in many cultures and are an old form of poetry. Douglas Florian uses this form in a lot of his poetry. I usually begin by sharing one of my list poems and ask the students to tell me what they notice about the structure. They tend to notice the variety of line length, the use of white space at the end and the surprise ending. I challenge them to incorporate these language elements into their own writing.

SCAREDY CAT MEMORIES
I used to be afraid of the dentist’s drill,
Creaky floorboards
And snakes at the end of my bed
Electricity
Knives and guns
Haircuts
Monsters lurking in the shadows
And dogs in the night
Nightmares
People with missing teeth
And big kids who harass you for being- little
Bee stings
Getting lost
Sharks
And drowning in quicksand
Baldness
My Nana’s toilet
And roosters

But now I’m afraid of ignorance.

Alan j Wright

*I usually reserve rhyming verse until the end of any intense work on poetry. Let’s face it, it’s fun, but most young poet’s find it difficult to control the beast. We often end up reading inane pieces of verse where a word is tacked on the end of a line purely because it rhymes rather than fits focus of the poem. I call it the Moon,June and spoon syndrome!

For this reason, I start quite small with rhyming verse, by introducing rhyming couplets as a cloze exercise and work from there. I am guided by the gradual release of responsibility model. As the writer gains confidence working through such exercises, I might only provide the first line and ask them to complete a second line. Lots of guided practice is needed. Interactive and shared writing are also useful instructional strategies to employ at this point. Finally, I get them to create their very own rhyming couplet

I Met A Man

As I was traveling to New York
I met a man who loved to………

He talked to me of many things
Apples, apes and angel’s ………

His words were like a sweet refrain
And now they’re deep inside my …….

Alan j Wright

So, there you have it. A smattering of alternatives. I have barely skimmed the surface of what’s possible with poetry. I guess my message is poetry presents a plethora of possibilities…








Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Objects of Poetry

We can all write poems about objects, particularly those we value. You may be in possession of an object you cherish quite deeply, or simply find appealing. You may have an object given to you by a loved one. You may have an object which arouses curiosity or mystery. Something we call a curio. On occasions I have found myself writing odes to seemingly everyday objects.

Let's Consider Objects

Find an object of interest and place it in front of you. Now look at it closely. Bring all your senses into play and begin to focus on all its details. Check out your selected object from different distances and angles- close up with a magnifying glass, or from a distance.

Try speaking to your object. Ask it questions. I suggest you do this when you are on your own, otherwise people may begin to think you are a bit loopy. But do it. Think about what your object might say if it had a voice. What would it tell you?

Now, start gathering possible words:

Where did you find or receive the object?
Where di…

Opposite Poems

Opposite Poems


In his book, 'How To Write Poetry,' Paul Janeczko presents the idea of opposite poems. Paul suggests they could also be referred to as antonym poems. This is wordplay and it's fun to try.

Here are some examples Paul provides to help us see very clearly how these short little poems work.

I think the opposite of chair
Is sitting down with nothing there

What is the opposite of kind?
A goat that butts you from behind

Paul Janeczko

You will  notice the poems are written in rhyming couplets. They can be extended so long as you remember to write in couplets. Paul shows us how this is done.

What is the opposite of new?
Stale gum that's hard to chew
A hot-dog roll as hard as rock
Or a soiled and smelly forgotten sock

You might notice that some of Paul's opposite Poems begin with a question. The remainder of the poem answer the question posed.

Opposite poems are a challenge, but it is a challenge worth trying. Not every thing has an opposite and not every word has an easy t…

When Poetry Visits The Traveller

I really enjoy the poems that emerge from my immediate engagement with places I visit.

When a poem arises from visiting a particular place, it is a joy for my poet's heart. I have written before about the 'poetry of place.' I recognise its strong influence on my writing. I look forward to the words that come flooding my way.

This little poem came to me during my very recent trip to Vietnam. It was a response to the morning skies that greeted me in the city of Hanoi. I stepped out and into the busy streets of the city's bustling old quarter and the skies above me were brooding, grey and heavy with expectation.It was all set up for me to notice- and I embraced the moment.

I encourage all young poets to be open to poetry ideas related to place. Ideas frequently present themselves whenever we do some mindful meandering in new or unfamiliar places. We must remain open to possibilities, wherever we go in this world.


Hanoi Morning
The sky
Seamless
Grey
Drapes itself suffocatingly
Over…