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Memories Can Spark Poetry

It's fascinating to think about the range of amazing things that influence our writing. I was sitting in my favourite writing space recently when I noticed the distinctive sound of a lawn mower outside in a neighbour's garden.


I no longer have to do this chore, but I hold strong memories of being mower man. The sounds, smells and the action are strikingly clear in my mind. 


As I began to recall my adolescent years, I remembered the mowing of the family lawns and this simple little poem helped me recapture the memory. 


It's something to consider when thinking about recounting your past. You don't always have to write a recount. You clearly have options. 


Lawn Thoughts
Alan j Wright

















Mowing the lawn                   
Is clippings in your hair
Up your nose              
In your socks

Mowing the lawn               
Is smoky fumes     
Swishing blades
Aromas of cut grass

Mowing the lawn               
Is hugging the edges                       
Avoiding the cat
 Gliding past Mum’s chrysanthemums

Mowing the lawn                
Is refilling the tank        
Dumping the clippings 
Raking and sweeping

Mowing the lawn
A neat, grassy haircut               
A summer chore                  

-And pocket money



Comments

  1. There's nothing like the smell of freshly mown grass, is there? I'm still the primary lawnmower around here and enjoyed your poetic trip down memory lane. I only wish someone were paying me pocket money...

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  2. I only wish I needed to cut my lawn. It's brown and dry as paper.

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  3. It's amazing what memories a sound can evoke.

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  4. Sound and smell are so strongly connected here - love the linkage between these two, and the rather mundane chore that evoked this poem.

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  5. ha! great memories....especially the pocket money. That sound, that smell, that feel of grass. Good memories but I'm ever so glad I don't have to mow anymore!

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  6. I was there! Thanks for the smells, sounds and sights - and the last line which made me smile.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The sound of a lawnmower is very evocative for me, too. Maybe I need to write a poem! Ruth, thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

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