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Curating A Quality Collection Of Poetry Books

This is a message for teachers. Teachers who teach poetry, Teachers who want to teach poetry more effectively.

Go to your school's library and seek out the poetry collection.

Have a really good look at the assembled books. Take some books from the shelves and open them and examine the poetry within the covers.

If what you are seeing is a motley 
collection of ancient unattractive titles and there doesn't appear to have been any additional texts added to the collection in over a decade, then it's time to morph into the Poetry Warrior!

Don't get me wrong, there may well be some great poetry hidden away within those tired looking titles. It would be sad not to bring them to the attention of your probationary poets. However, it's time to begin agitating for more books to be added to the collection and fast.

It becomes difficult to grow a love of poetry among young writers without a varied collection of classic and contemporary poetry books for them to pour over. We want them to grow into poetry action figures- and to achieve that aim, it requires a healthy collection of books. Immersion in poetry is a pre-requisite to writing poetry. A meagre collection of tired titles will not do it.

I published a list of poetry books here last year,and I am including it again in the hope that those meagre collections (in some school libraries) can be boosted dramatically. 
Good luck Poetry Warriors. Trust and hope you choose to accept this important and rewarding mission!

Remember, things will not get better until they get 'verse.'


Some Titles From My Poet's suitcase Collection

The Hypnotiser, Michael Rosen
Quick Let’s Get Out of Here, Michael Rosen
Michael Rosen’s Big Book of Bad Things,  Michael Rosen
Michael Rosen’s A to Z- The Best Children’s Poetry Selected by Michael Rosen
Untangling Spaghetti, Steven Herrick
Love That Dog, Sharon Creeech
Unspun Socks From a Chicken’s Laundry, Spike Milligan
Searching For Hen’s Teeth -Poetry From The Search Zone, Alan j Wright
Tadpoles In The Torrens, Poems for young readers, Edited by Jude Aquilina
Mongrel Doggerel, Elizabeth Honey
The Important Book, Margaret Wise- Brown
My Sister’s Hair, Sally Crabtree and Roberta Mathieson
Fire, Jackie French
The Dream of the Thylacine, Margaret Wild
Beach House, Deanna Caswell
Poems To Perform, Julia Donaldson
Touch The Poem, Arnod Adoff and Lisa Desimini
To This Day, Shane Koyczan
You Wait Till I’m Older Than You, Michael Rosen
The Death of the Hat, Poems Selected by Paul Janeczko
In The Swim, Douglas Florian
Insectopedia Douglas Florian
Poetrees, Douglas Florian
Comets, Stars, The Moons and Mars, Douglas Florian
Salting The Ocean, 100 poems by young poets, Naomi Shihab- Nye
Joyful Noise, poems for two voices, Paul Fleischman
All the Small Poems and Fourteen More, Valerie Worth
In The Tall Tall Grass, Denise Fleming
Some Things Are Scary, Florence Parry Heide
Imagine A Night, Sarah L Thomson
Waterbombs, Steven Herrick
Our Home Is Dirt By Sea- Australian Poems for Australian Kids, Selected by Diane Bates



And finally I am sharing my ever growing collection of VERSE Novels.

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