Skip to main content

Image Poem

Image Poem

This poem owes its existence to Georgia Heard's idea of the six room image poem where six elements are addressed in the writing that follows:

Image
Light
Sound
Questions
Feelings
Repetition

The challenge is to expand our vision of selected images by attending to each element when writing. The idea is to spend time considering each of the six elements by thinking about them as rooms we must enter in order to think more deeply about our word choice.


The Grandfather Clock

The Grandfather clock
Stood tall like a palace guard
Marking time in Nana's lounge-room
Against the wall
Avoiding the sunlight streaming through lace curtained windows
Tick-tocking as the pendulum swung in its unerring arc
Brass and chains and moving arms 
Encased behind a long glass face
The clock announced the passing of each hour
With blare and boom
The rowdy ringing out
Chased the silence from the room
Why so loud? the small ones asked
Why so tall? the small ones wondered
They kept their distance
Time moved on relentlessly
The Grandfather clock
Stood tall like a palace guard
Marking time in Nana's lounge-room



Comments

  1. This is an interesting way to view the makings of a poem, Alan. These lines stand out to me: The rowdy ringing out/Chased the silence from the room. Consider offering an image poem for my autumn gallery. I have a link at my PF post today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Carol. Will think about joining your autumn gallery.

      Delete
  2. I have often used Georgia's six room poem to jump start my ideas, and I used it with my students, too. They came up with some amazing poetry after thinking through their subject with these. Your poem brings that old grandfather clock to life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found the scaffolding provided by Georgia quite supportive to my thought processes around the subject of the poem Kay. I will certainly use it with students to encourage some deeper thought around the writing of their poetry. Glad you liked the poem, it has always been a strong visual memory.

      Delete
  3. I like that clothes hanger of a poem-skeleton by Georgia and what you've done with it. But where is the mouse? Done in by hickory-dickory-dock?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hickory-dickory-dock
      Two mice ran up a clock
      The clock struck one
      And the other one got away...

      That's my best interpretation Brenda.

      Delete
  4. I like it Alan. Will be trying out the six room plan today with year 4 students.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great Matt. Always good to hear about such positive endeavours. May the words flow freely...

      Delete
    2. Hi Alan, some of the students wanted to share their writing with you as we have been reading Searching for Hen's Teeth during our poetry session.

      https://sites.google.com/rowvilleps.vic.edu.au/creations4c/six-room-poetry

      Delete
    3. Thanks for the link Matt. I enjoyed the poems created by your budding poets. Well done all. Keep growing your poetry.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Opposite Poems

Opposite Poems


In his book, 'How To Write Poetry,' Paul Janeczko presents the idea of opposite poems. Paul suggests they could also be referred to as antonym poems. This is wordplay and it's fun to try.

Here are some examples Paul provides to help us see very clearly how these short little poems work.

I think the opposite of chair
Is sitting down with nothing there

What is the opposite of kind?
A goat that butts you from behind

Paul Janeczko

You will  notice the poems are written in rhyming couplets. They can be extended so long as you remember to write in couplets. Paul shows us how this is done.

What is the opposite of new?
Stale gum that's hard to chew
A hot-dog roll as hard as rock
Or a soiled and smelly forgotten sock

You might notice that some of Paul's opposite Poems begin with a question. The remainder of the poem answer the question posed.

Opposite poems are a challenge, but it is a challenge worth trying. Not every thing has an opposite and not every word has an easy t…

List Poems Are Easy To Like

A list poem is one of the easiest kinds of poems to write because it doesn't require a set rhythm or rhyme. But that doesn't mean you should write anything down helter- skelter.

Consider the inclusion of the following elements to make a list poem a poem instead of just a list:

• The writer is telling you something--pointing something out--saying, "Look at this," or, "Think about this."
• There's a beginning and end to it, like in a story.
• In other words, the poem needs to make sense and have some kind of flow to it.

List poems provide an easy and successful structure to get children feeling more comfortable with poetry. They are to be found in the poetry of many cultures and have been employed successfully by many contemporary poets.

Poetry is full of surprises. List also need to be full of surprises. Without the occasional surprise your list poems will have all the appeal of a supermarket shopping list on a day when you don't want to go shopping!

Here …

A Spike In The Level Of Nonsense

Terence Alan Milligan, known as 'Spike' (1918-2002) dedicated his life to making people laugh, through his performances on radio and television, through his poems and memoirs, and often just by being himself. A BBC poll in 1999 voted Spike 'The funniest person of the last 1,000 years.' -That's some accolade. Spike was the chief creator and writer of the famous Goon Show, a British radio comedy programme, performed from 1951 to 1960. The cast also included, Peter Sellers, Harry Secombe and Michael Bentine.

Spike revelled in funny poems. He was influenced by Edward Lear and Lewis Carroll, two famous English poets of the past who also loved extravagant wordplay and nonsensical stories. 
His verse was considered to be within the genre of literary nonsense. His most famous poem, On the Ning Nang Nong, was voted the UK's favourite comic poem in 1998 in a nationwide poll, ahead of other nonsense poets including Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear. It remains a favourite, and …