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Poetry Friday -Trimeric Poems


Trimeric Poems
Today it gives me great pleasure to share a Trimeric Poem. A poetry form I have recently discovered. A poetry form I really like...

The poem begins to build seamlessly as you go, due to its expectation for the writer to repeat lines used in the first four line stanza in order to launch each subsequent three line stanza.  

The Trimeric poetry form was invented by Charles A. Stone, and the rules are quite straightforward :

A Trimeric poem consists of 4 stanzas
The first stanza has 4 lines
The other three stanzas have 3 lines each
The first line of each 3 line stanza is a refrain of the corresponding line in the first stanza (so 2nd stanza starts with the second line, third stanza starts with the third line, etc.)
No rules apply for line length, meter, or rhyme. I;ve coloured coded my poem so you can see how the structure has been informed.


Inkblot

I was born into a world of blotting paper
Ink wells and fountain pens
A left handed writer
In a writing minefield

Ink wells and fountain pens
Held the indigo liquid
Providing shape to letters and words

A left handed writer
Forever wary of smudges
Afraid of blots and blobs on pristine pages

In a writing minefield
I remained forever trepidacious
-And then along came the ballpoint pen

Alan j Wright








Comments

  1. A new form for me--will have to give it a try! My older sister is left-handed, and although her teachers tried to get her to write with her right hand, they failed and she came home with smudges too. Your ending made me smile.

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    Replies
    1. I feel a strong connection to your sister's experience Buffy. They tried to change me too. They failed quite miserably. Serves them 'right.'
      Hope you find joy in trying this poetic form.

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  2. Oh, I'd like to try this form. What fun you've made it, Alan. And that ending is a zinger!

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  3. Glad youl ike it Linda. Love the idea of a zinger line. Poet's are advised to end just as strongly as they begin, so your comment encourages me.

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  4. A new form to try! Thanks for your clear explanation of the form (Yay for color coding!) and for a great mentor poem. As others have already noted, that ending line is perfect.

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    Replies
    1. Glad you like the colour coding Molly. I just felt it was necessary when 'showing; the structure. It is said a poet must begin and end strongly, so the fact readers like the final line is most gratifying.

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  5. Me, too! Me, too! I think I'll try this today with a poem about the black swallowtail caterpillar that is transforming itself into a chrysalis via butterflyhood.

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    Replies
    1. Love the fact that you already are in rehearsal Mary Lee. Go get those words!

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  6. Great poem! Perfect build up to that final line. I've not heard of this form. I'm looking forward to giving it a try. Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Kimberly. Hope you enjoy 'making' a Trimeric poem as much as I did.

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  7. This is a new form for me, too. I'd like to try it. Thanks for sharing it and your poem. It will be a great mentor text to use.

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    Replies
    1. My pleasure Kay. You humble me with your mention of a mentor text. Good luck with Trimeric trial.

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  8. Delighted to learn of this form, too! And, I've always been a sucker for dip pens, so I love this subject of your poem as well. Nicely done - Thanks for sharing!

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    Replies
    1. I appear to have pleased you on both counts Robyn. How good is that?

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  9. Replies
    1. So glad you like it as a poetry form. I like it too. A lot. I am currently writing more poems in this style in my writer's notebook. It is a most engaging structure.

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  10. Another T form for the AtoZ Challenge next year! Woo-hoo!
    My husband is left-handed, and used fountain pens for years. He somehow got the knack of turning his hand. Never wanted me to use his pens so I wouldn't ruin the nib's flow for him! I think he bought a special lefty nib.

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    Replies
    1. Pleased to have been of assistance Donna. Rather than turn my hand, I write from beneath. Lefties tend to be mostly 'pushers' or 'hookers.' I'm not too sure what to call what I do. I can understand why husband doesn't want you to use his fountain pen. They do become shaped in a particular direction after time spent with a writer of a particular persuasion. Not sure about lefty nibs. Interesting...

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    2. https://blog.gouletpens.com/2017/09/lamy-oblique-and-left-handed-nibs-whats

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    3. Thanks For the follow up Donna. I will check it out. Every day we chip away at our ignorance...

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  11. Fun poem Alan, I love your "writing minefield." My daughter is left handed but fortunately didn't have to deal with fountain pens, but she's an artist so she has worked with pen holders with nibs and of course scissors. Thanks for sharing this new trimeric poem form, Kay McGriff left a link to your post as she tried this form out this week.

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    1. Thanks for the alert Michelle. I have been away for a few weeks and then noticed your comment. Glad you liked the poem. I am enjoying this form and have written several other Trimeric poems since 'Inkblot.'

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