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Amazing Alliteration- All Around Us


Alliteration is the repetition of the initial consonants of words. It involves the use of the same letter or sound at the beginning of a series of closely connected words. 

Alliteration does not depend on letters but on sounds, so 'Kerry came' is alliteration, even though  the words start with different letters. The word -alliteration is derived from the Latin word, 'Latira'. It means 'letters of alphabet'.  

 If you have had experience with tongue twisters, you've met alliteration. 'Show Shawn Sharon's shabby shoes.' is an example of alliteration. Alliteration is used by many writers and poets as it adds style to the sound of the words. 

British poet, Michael Rosen believes literary elements like alliteration possess secret strings that sew the selected words together.

I really enjoy using alliteration. In fact, I have to guard against over using it at times, such is its appeal to my ears. In the poem below, I have deliberately liberally lathered it across each line to emphasize its poetic prowess.


Lemon Delight

Laura Lane from Lilydale

Loves luscious lemon tart

The tantalizing taste

Tingles her tongue, 

-so tempting from the start.

She begins with nice, neat nibbles

It's such a tasty treat

Mighty, munchy, morsels

For Laura Lane to eat.

Alan j Wright



Today is Poetry Friday and this week's host is Robyn Hood Black  at Life On The Deckle Edge who is highlighting the recently released poetry anthology 'Hop To It -Poems To Get You Moving. You will also find links to a host of other poetry pursuits...


Comments

  1. Alliteration is one of my favorite poetry tools, and you have "meticulously mastered" it in this fun poem! :)

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    1. Thank you Kimberly. Alliteration is indeed a lot of fun with which one can play.

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  2. I love the musicality in your poem provided by your multiple alliterative lines. The poem is full of "secret strings that sew the selected words together", Alan.

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    1. Love your alliterative response Carol. Secret strings indeed.

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  3. Delightful, Alan! I too like alliteration and in this poem it makes reading it so much fun.

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    1. Thank you Janice. Glad you enjoyed my alliteration efforts.

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  4. I love the rhythm that alliteration often adds, too, Alan. This would be fun to memorize "Mighty, munchy, morsels"!

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    1. I agree Linda. alliteration does set up a rhythm. Such literary devices are most supportive of inexperienced readers.

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  5. I think my mouth puckered reading your poem, Alan. "Tingles her tongue" I also like the idea of "alliteration possess secret strings that sew the selected words together" :)

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    1. Hardly surprising Bridget, there is a surfeit of lemon in my poem. This very week we harvested a bounty of huge lemons from our garden, so lemons are very much to the fore for me right now. The secret strings notion is certainly a good analogy when explaining alliteration to impressionable learners.

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  6. lovely! And fun. I can imagine you writing away giggling at the thought of Laura Lane and her lemon tart.

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    1. As I said to Bridget, lemons loomed large (literally) this week at our place. So the freshness and the bountiful beauty of lemons was front and centre in my writing deliberations. Glad you enjoyed my little verse Linda.

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  7. I can relate to Laura Lane's lack of self-control with her luscious lemon tart!

    Here's my daily tongue twister. It's not alliteration, but the SH sound that appears in three different positions in these names in my class makes me slow down so I don't bungle them (doesn't help that students show up in alphabetical order by first name on my Google Meet screen!): Santosh, Shlok, Sushanth. Say THOSE three times fast!!

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    1. You have managed to tie my tongue in a knot. I can see why you pause Mary Lee.

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  8. A tasty treat of a poem, Alan, and thanks for the fun introduction as well. :0)

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    1. Thank you Robyn. Alliteration is contagious in the nicest possible way...

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