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Cereal Killer- A Rant Poem

I have been having so much fun lately exploring rant

poetry. Poets have long written about the things that vex

(annoy) them. The practice of ranting in poetic verse

dates back to Ancient Greece, Rant poetry has flourished 

through time.Rant poetry comes in all shapes and sizes,

but it is most commonly defined as a free-verse poem

written about an exasperating subject. They can be about

any thing that aggravates, pesters, or otherwise drives

you crazy. This  poem is based on a frustration that 

began in my childhood and persists to this very day.


Cereal Killer

Alan j Wright
It’s Saturday morning
I’m awake
And therefore I’m hungry
I shuffle to the pantry
I stare
The shelf is bare
There’s nothing there
I’m old Mother Hubbard
Once more at the cupboard
I have a bowl
A spoon
Milk
And there’s not a sign of Wheat Bix
No packet
No crumb
I’m crestfallen, glum
Somewhere out there
Lurks a cereal killer

I’m ravenous
My stomach, cavernous
I’m starvin’ Marvin
This is immense
It has me intense
It’s a big deal
Earth shattering
…well, maybe not earth shattering
But it’s enough to set me on fire
It raises my ire
I begin to perspire
I’m miffed
I’ve been stiffed
My world’s coming adrift

Make yourself some toast says Dad
Have an egg instead says Mum
Suffer, hisses my sister the snake
Make some porridge
Suggests dear old Nan…
Porridge?
It’s summertime
Surely I would melt

Dad flops a brick as he calls it
On the table
Ride to the shop
And buy some more
No big deal my boy
I just fume

I’m desperate
So, I’m off on my bike
An angry, anxious pedaler

Half way there
I realize something really important
-I’m still wearing my pyjamas

I keep pedalling
On a mission
To the Milk bar at the corner
Breakfast cereal or break

Mr. Nguyen
Mr. Nguyen
Have you got a packet of Wheat Bix?
Sorry says Mr. Nguyen
I’m all out of Wheat Bix
Do you want Rice Pops instead?

I could scream
I could cry
And yell at the sky
I just want my Wheat Bix
I just want my Wheat Bix
I just want…
Mr. Nguyen says try the supermarket

Pedal, pedal, pedal
To the supermarket
Hot bothered and famished
I race down the cereal aisle
And snatch a super-size pack
Of the one and only
WHEAT BIX, yeah!
Breakfast, here I come…

Pedal, pedal, pedal
Back home
Dad’s got his hand out
Waiting for the change

I’m hollow
I’m empty
I’m dog hungry starving
It’s time to chow down
Breakfast at last!

Munching and crunching
No time for talking
Cereal killers

You will never beat me


Comments

  1. Nice rant Allan! I would love to share this with my class. I might start working on my own!

    ReplyDelete

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