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Fun With Word Pattern Poetry

Poets sometimes like to play around with structure and shape. And because it is #Poetry Friday, I decided to play around with some poetry structures. It was at this point I found myself aware of poetry's connection to mathematics. I began to think of a structure involving a word pattern that went:

First line -3 words
Second line- 2 words
Third line - 1 word
Fourth line -1 word
Fifth line - 2 words
Sixth line - 3 words

So the pattern went like this: 3,2,1,1,2,3. The poem is dependent on word count per line, not syllables.

I'm really not sure what to call this poetic structure. Maybe, I could call them Flip Poems. If anybody has used this structure before and knows exactly what it is called, kindly let me know. My research has so far not turned up anything to suggest these poems have a given name.

Here are a couple of examples from my notebook.

In the morning
Magpies carol
Daily birdsong
Warms my heart

The cruel wind
Complains noisily
Howling, screaming
Blow hard, bully


  1. Hi Alan. I enjoyed these! I like "Blow hard bully" (I'm hearing "blowhard bully" which adds another layer to the wind's personality.) haven't heard of this form before. Flip Poems sounds like a good name for them.

  2. Thank you Violet. Glad you like the name, Flip Poems. You have alerted me to the need to add a comma after hard to clarify the difference between blowhard and blow hard.

  3. I like them. I am not familiar with a form like this one. Flip seems like a good name.

  4. Thanks Brenda. The name is growing on me.

  5. They do look like fun, Alan - but you realise you're a rule-breaker from the get-go? Your second poem doesn't follow the format, because it only has one line with one word - not two. I quite like the way the second poem pivots on that one word - almost a centre-twist.

    1. Thank you for your close and considered reading Katherine. It was a typing omission. It slipped out of the original. I have made amends.

  6. Fun form - flip poems sums it up perfectly. =)


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