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Wintery Words Poem In Spring

It is meant to be spring, but it still feels like winter! Winter refuses to leave. A lingering season, grinning at our discomfort. Hence, this little poem. Brrr...

Chilly Winds Out There

Winter grins
Chilly winds
Teeth are all a'chatter
Rug up tight
Fading light
Falling leaves
All scatter.
Winter grins
Chilly winds
Icy gales blow
Step around
Muddy ground
Everywhere I go.
Winter grins
Chilly winds
Clouds gather in a cluster
Lightning flashes
Thunder crashes
Tis' a menacing southerly buster.
Winter grins
Chilly winds
Race to beat the storm
Shut the door
Against the roar
Inside, safe and warm.

Comments

  1. The best part of winter is how cozy indoors becomes. Your poem captures that perfectly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The appeal of the indoors and warmth certainly assumes importance when winter 'reigns.'

      Delete
  2. I love the idea of "winter grins", Alan, and wish for you that it would take its leave soon so you could welcome spring. Love "shut the door/Against the roar". I think we'll be doing that soon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stay warm Linda. Today it's a bit warmer. Spring days will eventually take hold here, I'm certain.

      Delete
  3. Oh dear...we're heading into winter, so this poem seems to foretell the future for those of us in the northern hemisphere...! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jane, I have no desire to be a prophet of doom. May your descent into winter be gentle and measured.

      Delete
  4. I can almost feel the chill, Alan. Sending you warm vibes from the hot desert. =)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Bridget. We are a fair way from experiencing desert days at present, but it will warm up - eventually.

      Delete
    2. Your poem captures well the feeling of Winter overstaying his (or her) welcome. It is not a foreign feeling to me (though on the opposite end of the calendar to you).

      Delete

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