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A Poem Is Brewing


I love it when the words come calling. What a buzz. This poem is about those thoughts and ideas that rock'n' roll around in the brain before the words splash out onto the page.

 I found myself absorbed with rehearsing my words for over a week before I was actually able to share the words with my notebook. They entertained me. They challenged me. They puzzled me. In the end they made me feel poetically pleased.

I have reworked the words here. This poem is essentially about the birth of a poem.





Poembrew

 A poem is brewing in my brain.
In the far reaches of thought and contemplation
Words assemble in ones and twos
Clusters and battalions.
Sweet lines with potent phrasing
Float on the horizon of possibility
Inviting attention.
A poem is brewing in my brain
Words clang, collide and collude
Jostling for best position.
A song of composition
Rises gradually across days and nights
Bringing with it rhyme and reason
As the focus sharpens.
A poem is brewing in my brain
It pops and sparks and sizzles.
I have wait patiently for its arrival
As one would a visit from a friend.
A poem is brewing in my brain.
Soon it will spill across the pages of my notebook.
Words shaped and massaged to fit their allotted spaces.
Words warm and raw
Some slide easily onto the line.
Others snap into place
Like Lego pieces,
As they take up position
In readiness for the poet’s pop-eyed approval.


Comments

  1. A wonderful brew is one that pops and sizzles where no one can see and no one can drink until it's done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those of us who choose to write, know this feeling of anticipation. As you allude to Brenda, the writer remains in charge until ready to share the newly formed offering.

      Delete
  2. Yes - captures the madcap madness of creation. Sometimes all we can do is sit back and let the poem flow!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like your alliterative response Jane. There exists in the process of creating new words a sense of madcap madness.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. Thank you Violet. I enjoyed the process immensely.

      Delete
  5. Such fun to read aloud. I especially love, "Words clang, collide and collude."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was an enjoyable line to compose Laura. Some poems do lend themselves to being read aloud more easily than others. I am glad you think these words sound good off the tongue.

      Delete
  6. love the energy here, Alan - all that hustle and bustle in the brain that it takes to craft poetry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the feedback Tara. Capturing the energy and effort that goes into the crafting of the words was central to the writing. I am glad it came through.

      Delete

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