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Where Does Your Poetry Hide?


Poetry is an ever inclusive part of my summer writes. It calls out to me to be included. In those lazy, hazy days, I shall seek it out in every corner ...  
In truth, it's with me all year round, wherever I am. So, where is it hiding? Where is it to be found? Let’s investigate…



Where Does My Poetry Hide?

Where does my poetry hide?
It snuggles in snatches of conversations  
floating down the street
It rocks about in my collected treasures
Junky and jumbled

I look for it in lettuce, limes and lemons 

In asparagus, apples, even anchovies
It might be sealed a packet of peppermints
A jar of peanut butter
Escaping with aromatic intensity
Poetry washes up on the shoreline 
in clusters of seashells
Glittering sea glass
Seaweed and wet sand

I seek it out in a song’s refrain

And voices in a playground
I find it nestling in my favourite books
It emerges in isolated words
and fabulous fragments
Angry and otherwise
It swirls in the mumbles and whispers rumbling against the internal walls of houses.
It develops in photographs that magically reveal my history

Poetry soothes me in sonorous voices on the radio
And thunders at me on stormy mornings
I can spot it in a day old newspaper article
or a marescent autumn leaf

Poetry reveals itself in my wife’s eyes

It announces itself in simple pleasures, 
Or recollections of days long past
It is minute like smidgens and skerricks
Things barely seen or blown to smithereens 
It is immense like boulders, bridges and reservoirs 

I hear poetry in the morning carols of magpies

I wake each day knowing it’s out there
waiting for me to discover its hiding spots.

Alan j Wright


So poets bold and brave, where does your poetry hide?



Sometimes my poetry hides among other words


Comments

  1. Poetry might be hiding most anywhere, if only I open my eyes to look for it! My goal for the month of December is to take time to look for the places poetry might be hiding in each day--and then bring it into the open with a few words.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have identified a most worthy and promising goal for the month of December Kay. It promises revelations no doubt.

      Delete
  2. Poetry is in my heartbeat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your poet's heart must be strong Joy.

      Delete
  3. Sometimes my poetry hides in plain sight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The old hiding in plain sight trick Mary. Oh so true.

      Delete
  4. ooh Alan, I love this. The lines "and fabulous fragments
    Angry and otherwise". I think my poetry hides EVERYWHERE! But mostly, I don't find it - it finds me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sally for your feedback. I am so glad poetry finds you. That way we all win.

      Delete

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