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Kimo Poems

Kimo poems are an Israeli version of haiku. It is claimed that there was a need for more syllables when writing  haiku style poems in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar to traditional haiku:

3 lines. No rhymes.

10 syllables in the first line,

7  syllables in the second, 

6 syllables in the third.

The Kimo focuses on a single image (kind of like a snapshot). So it's uncommon to have any movement happening in Kimo poems.

So, here is my kimo poem. Give it a try...


Nature's Cathedral

I stand in awe among the giant trees

This glorious cathedral

While silence surrounds me.

©Alan j Wright


















It is Poetry Friday and our host this week is Laura Purdie Salas . Laura shares some Tankas about autumn for the #PoetryPals challenge. She also has a new book coming out: If You Want To Knit Some Mittens!

Comments

  1. It's great to see a new idea for haiku, fitting another language. I have a cotton wood tree outside in my garden, over a hundred years old, a "youngster" by many standards but it's part of why I moved to this new place a while ago. Trees surround me, and I love that idea of "glorious cathedral", Alan. Beautiful pictures, too.

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    1. New poetry forms and ancient trees- what a potentially rich connection Linda. I can easily see your attraction to your sweet location. Glad you liked my images. They are from my childhood location which i like to visit when I need a little solitude.

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  2. Gorgeous poem and image! I follow @big_trees_ohio on Instagram and am constantly in awe of "This glorious cathedral"!!

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    1. Mary Lee, I am sensing a strong link between we poets and nature's giants. Thank you for your positive response to my Kimo poem and the accompanying images.

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  3. Ooh, interesting. I'm unfamiliar with this form. And even though you say movement is rare, and the speaker stands still, there's such a lovely movement of the silence itself cradling the poet. Gorgeous!

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    1. I too was unfamiliar with Kimo until quite recently Laura. Glad you enjoyed the introduction.

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  4. Oooh! A new to me form. Must try this. Thank you for the idea and the perfect example. The photos pair perfectly with your poem. I love seeing form "twists" from around the world.

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    1. You're right Linda, it is a form twist, but it still delivers for the poet as an interesting short form structure. Glad you liked my response and the images that I added to the mix.

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  5. It's a new form to me, too. Thank you, Alan! Beautiful poem; it reminds me of the poor redwoods under threat out in California. We are losing too many cathedrals lately.

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    1. Thank you Susan. The loss of these natural cathedrals is a tragedy for the world.

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  6. I love a new form for a different language, and then bringing it back to English! So from Japanese to Hebrew to English - such a journey!

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    1. Interesting observation Ruth. It is as you write, a journey. It reinforces the notion of poetry's adaptability.

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  7. I like so much about this. And trees, it reminded me of the redwoods this spring and the California Fam Palms of last weekend

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    1. Jone, as I stated in one of my earlier comments, we poets are without a doubt very much in awe of trees- wherever they might be. The Kimo provided the structure to display my enduring appreciation of these natural wonders.

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  8. This is a new form for me - thanks for sharing it with us! Your poem really feels like a snapshot, even without the gorgeous photos (which complement it perfectly).

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    1. Glad you enjoyed meeting a new poetry form Elisabeth. It broadens possibility. The notion of a snapshot does indeed capture what a Kimo poem is meant to do- so your words are most re-assuring.

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  9. Thanks for the new form, Alan, I need to try this. I do love the insertion of the words, "glorious cathedral", Alan.

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    1. Glorious cathedral seemed like an appropriate attribution carol. Glad you like it too.

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