Skip to main content

Rondelet Poem

Rondelet Poems

This week I am sharing information regarding Rondelet poems. The rondelet is a typical French form with rhymes and refrains. 

Here are the basic guidelines for this poetic form:

7 lines

Lines 1, 3, and 7 are refrains

Refrain lines are 4 syllables long, other lines are 8 syllables

Rhyme scheme: AbAabbA

So here's my attempt at a Rondelet poem...


Let Me Lift Your Spirits

Just let me know

If you need words to make you smile

Just let me know

I can bring you love and laughter

I could walk with you awhile

We could celebrate with style

Just let me know


Alan j Wright

It's Poetry Friday once again...
Our host this week is Tricia at Miss Rumphius Effect  Please visit to discover more about the effects of grief on the human condition. 








Comments

  1. What a fun new form! It feels like it should be set to music!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you like it Mary Lee. I agree, it does possess a musical quality to its form.

      Delete
  2. Thanks for the introduction to this form. A wonderful theme, and I particularly like the lines "If you need words to make you smile" and "I could walk with you awhile."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Elisabeth. Glad the words I wrote struck a chord.

      Delete
  3. This is a totally charming form. I've written it down and want to try it. I love the refrain placement and the use of line length. And your poem reminds kids that it's OK to ask for what you need at a time when we are all feeling so separate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Go for it Janice. It was initially challenging, but I'm glad I persisted. Hopefully the words speak a little for these times.

      Delete
  4. It's nice, Alan. I love the tone you've set, heartful of caring. It's interesting to me that the guide sets the 'refrain' first. But you've shown that it works very well. Thanks for the intro!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keen observation Linda. The refrain assumes a slightly different role here, but it sets up the poem that rolls out from that introductory line. Glad you liked the meeting with the Rondelet

      Delete
  5. How lovely....an old form with a modern feel in your words. Love, 'just let me know.'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Linda. Sometimes those everyday phrases lend themselves perfectly to our poetic needs.

      Delete
  6. Thanks for the new form. I love the refrain.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jone. It just popped up and I thought let's go somewhere together...

      Delete
  7. Your rondelet is lovely Alan, as is the pic! I thought of the rondel or aka rondeau. I like this slightly shorter version too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Michelle. These forms are close in structure.

      Delete
  8. Ah, this made me smile. I love the photo you paired with your poem, too. A lovely rondelet that leaves me wanting to celebrate words with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Smiling is good Karen. Let the celebrations begin!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Opposite Poems

O pp o s ite P oem s In his book, ' How To Write Poetry,'  Paul Janeczko presents the idea of opposite poems. Paul suggests they could also be referred to as antonym poems. This is wordplay and it's fun to try. Here are some examples Paul provides to help us see very clearly how these short little poems work. I think the opposite of chair Is sitting down with nothing there What is the opposite of kind? A goat that butts you from behind Paul Janeczko You will  notice the poems are written in rhyming couplets. They can be extended so long as you remember to write in couplets. Paul shows us how this is done. What is the opposite of new? Stale gum that's hard to chew A hot-dog roll as hard as rock Or a soiled and smelly forgotten sock You might notice that some of Paul's opposite Poems begin with a question. The remainder of the poem answer the question posed. Opposite poems are a challenge, but it is a challenge worth trying. Not e

Life Cycle -A football poem by Bruce Dawe

This poem by Australian poet Bruce Dawe epitomises the unique connection sporting tragics have to their preferred football teams, -an almost tribal allegiance. Each season supporters stare down the twin imposters- victory and defeat. They remain both loyal and hopeful of eventual triumph. This poem refers specifically to Australian Rules Football, but it's themes are universal. I share this poem on the eve of the 2017 Grand Final to decide the Premiership for this football season. My team, the Richmond Tigers have reached the play off to decide the ultimate victor. They have not contested the Grand Final match for 35 years. My hopes fly with them. This poem links two of my great loves -football and poetry... Life Cycle When children are born in Victoria they are wrapped in club-colours, laid in beribboned cots, having already begun a lifetime’s barracking. Carn, they cry, Carn … feebly at first while parents playfully tussle with them for possession of a rusk: Ah, he

Poetry Friday: The Safety Pin Poem

Poets not only write poetry, they also read poetry. In order to be able to write poetry, one must read it. Lots of poetry in fact...  I want to share a short little poem by Valerie Worth. I bought Valerie's book, 'All The Small Poems And Fourteen More,' while living and working in New York, some time back. It remains a personal favourite.  I love the way the poet shines a special light on everyday objects, transforming them into something unique and worthy of attention. Her close observations elevate her poems into the special category.  Each poem in the collection celebrates earthly wonders. From eggs to garbage, from potatoes to pockets, each object is given special attention in the form of short poems employing keen observations.  Valerie Worth demonstrates through her poems she totally understands the saying-'ideas exist in things.'  The poem I have chosen to share with you (one of my personal favourites) is titled, 'Safety Pin'. S af