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Clogyrnach Poems

Clogyrnach Poems

Besides being another intriguing word to say 'clogyrnach' is also a poetic form, both challenging and engaging to write.

A  form of poetry, Welsh in origin, typically a six-line, syllable driven stanza with an ab rhyme scheme: 

Line 1: 8 syllables with an a rhyme

Line 2: 8 syllables with an a rhyme

Line 3: 5 syllables with a b rhyme

Line 4: 5 syllables with a b rhyme

Line 5: 3 syllables with a b rhyme

Line 6: 3 syllables with an a rhyme

So when I stumbled upon it recently, I thought I must try this. My desire to meet this new poetry challenge was compelling. Here is my Clogyrnach Poem.

 









The Wind On A Winter's Night

A winter's night, without the moon

The wind directs the fall leaves -swoon

It rattles the doors

Shaking trees, it soars

The night roars

Wild tunes.


©Alan j Wright







It is once again Poetry Friday and our host this week is Irene Latham. Irene is exulting all things autumnal in her post.Please call by to find out more and discover links to other poets as well.


Comments

  1. Ooh, I love what you did with this form! (You make it look easy, and I am sure it is not.) I especially love the last line—listening to "wild tunes" is one of my favorite things. Thank you!

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    1. Thank you Irene. I must confess it took some pushing and shoving to get the words to finally slot into place. It became an exercise in stickability- but I enjoyed the challenge. Glad you appreciate the ending. It pleased me too-even when it arrived late!

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  2. Lovely form and poem, Alan. I also love Wild tunes, which is what I listen to when I walk. I have to try this and wrote down the scheme. Thanks!

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    1. Grazie Janice! The notion of wild tunes in wild untamed places has much appeal. Best wishes with your Clogyrnach!

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  3. Thanks for introducing us to a new poetic form. Great job!

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  4. We have this weather coming soon, so I'm glad to read a poem for it, Alan. As Irene said, you made it look easy! I had to look up how to pronounce the form, too. Fun!

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    1. A weather appropriate poem Linda. What synchronicity... As I admitted to Irene, I had to herd the words into their allotted spaces.

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  5. Oh, the rattling and roaring. A good winter storm is swoon-worthy, indeed! I've written one clogyrnach--several years ago. It's a form I'd like to revisit!

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    1. Time to revisit the Clgyrnach Laura! Batten down the hatches the storm is nigh...

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  6. Thanks for the introduction to a new poetry form, Alan. I love the feeling evoked in your poem. It made me want to crawl under a soft quilt. The music of the wind is certainly a wild tune.

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    1. You're welcome Rose. Stay snug when the those night storms descend.

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  7. Well played! Now I want to write a clogyrnach!

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  8. Alan, I always know I'll find something to spark an idea when I visit your posts. Your clogyrnach is wonderful and I especially like those "wild tunes". I'm definitely going to play around with this form! Thanks!

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    1. Thank you Molly for your generous remarks. I wish you well on your Clogyrnach project. The wild tunes finish seems to have garnered approval.

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  9. Another new form to me, and you did a great job with it!

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    1. Thank you Ruth. There are so many opportunities to embark into the unknown. Poetry is no different. A new challenge is exhilarating, a brand new learning experience.

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  10. Alan, thanks for this new poetic form. Your example for us is so lovely that I would love to have you offer it for a winter gallery of mine. Since I did not have an offering for my summer gallery that I am about to post the last section, I looked back into my gmail and found a lovely one from 2017 that I am going to insert. Think fall and send me one of your autumn image poems and if you like, the winter poem above. So much to love about this new poetic format.

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  11. Alan, I was just lost in playing with this new form for a while. It is very interesting. Yes, challenging and engaging, and I'm sure very satisfying when you get it just right. I can hear the night roaring wild tunes! Well done.

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