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Writing ODES To Everyday Things

 I found myself rummaging through my wardrobe and came across a collection of old ties. I rarely wear ties anymore, but there was a time when I wore a tie regularly during my days as a school administrator. They were always bright, some would say, garish. 



My aim  back then was to add some colour to the day. They became a talking point for staff and students. My ties were varied in colour and quality. Somewhat questionable strip of cloth, you might say. 

These days they just hang in my wardrobe as historical artifacts. The discovery of those ties has inspired me though. It has inspired me to write an ode to everyday things! 

The poet, Pablo Neruda devoted a whole volume of poems to simple objects. Ties certainly fall into this category. An ode to one of my ties seems therefore acceptable. It has brightened an otherwise drab day.

Ode To A Tie


We once hung out
Quite regularly
You used to hug my neck
And keep my collar neat and tidy
You protected my shirts
From crumbs, stray morsels
And Thai food stains

You were the colourful one
Draped across my shirt
An eye catcher

In those days
You went to school with me
And your dazzling presence
Your pattern of bright flowers
Snapped eyes to attention
You were a carpet of colour
A strong statement on an otherwise
grey day

You served me well
That is why
You remain with me
We are  tied
Forever

Alan j Wright

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